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January 2, 2005 6:11 AM quote 
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 Best Fryer Oil
Hi - I'm currently using deodorized lard for my deep-fat fryers but I fear the time has come to start rethinking the artery-clogging impact that may be having on my customers - having said that, what is the best fryer oil in terms of taste, longevity, price, etc. Peanut oil would be a no-no in today's socieity with so many having nut allergies. There is also a product that extends the life of fryer oil but I forget the name - does it really work or is it just a marketing ploy? Thanks for your thoughts.

GardenDarlene

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January 2, 2005 12:44 PM quote 
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Hi Darlene,

Put the other twist on it and realize you probably aren't using trans-fats (check the label for hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated). I'd much prefer real lard any day!

As much as fat has taken a hard rap the past couple of decades, the percentage of overweight and obese US citizens has increased greatly. If you want to look at this from a health standpoint, studies are now conflicting on whether or not saturated fat is bad for you but all do agree that trans-fats are bad.

If you're looking at wanting to offer 'healthier' options, be sure to have some tasty veggies and salads. Consider offering these as optional sides instead of fries. Serve water to all customers --so many restaurants don't anymore-- and realize the rest is up to the customer.

~ Linda
January 6, 2005 10:17 AM quote 
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I like a blend of corn and canola. I never cook over 375 degrees. I strain it and change it often. I deep-fry as few things as possible.
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January 6, 2005 11:26 AM quote 
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Peanut oil is the best. Just ask Chic-fil-A. The only problem is that some people are allergic to peanuts. They don't seem to lose business because of it. Everything seems to taste better in peanut oil. I sometimes use Canola Oil but the quality is sometimes questionable. The last two times I received oil that was hardening. Maybe something was added but not listed.
January 14, 2005 7:24 AM quote 
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hi Darlene:

I've been using Sysco's Fry-On since I opened my restaurant 2 years ago. I really like this product (corn and canola combination). We initially did a taste comparison test with several fryer products (fries and the like) with different oils and the fry-on fried products were chosen every time. I find that there is no flavour transfers and the it has a great life. I mean, I'll think that the oil should be changed (based on length of time of use) but when I do the "dropper test" (sysco provides) it usually is not ready for a change.

YMMV

cheers
Andrea
January 14, 2005 1:21 PM quote 
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Thanks everyone for your comments and suggestions. I don't use Sysco as my supplier but I will check with Gordon Foodservice rep to see if they have a similar product.

GardenDar
January 21, 2005 8:32 AM quote 
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In my experience, Frymax works pretty good. However, there's more to it than just the kind of oil you use.
You have to know how to fry. Dont' overload the baskets. About half way is good.
At the end of the night, strain the oil and clean the fryer out. It'll extend the fry life of your oil, and alleviate flavor transfer.
Make sure you have the temperature set properly.

I have accounts that use the cheap oil, thinking it makes no difference. It does indeed make a difference. I had one account using a vegetable/lard blend, and it was broke down and smoking in just one day. Not a good product. Food looked overcooked when it was undercooked, all that nasty smoke curling up off of it..they were using a high end fry and trashing it, cooking it in garbage oil.
Use the good stuff and use it right, and you'll see major improvement.
January 22, 2005 12:59 AM quote 
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We tried fry max...was suppose to last longer and we couldn't tell a difference. Now we just use "liquid clear fry" made by Ventura....we like it better than anything else we've used.
January 26, 2005 11:18 PM quote 
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I would agree that creamy liquid shortening is the best.
strain it every 2 shifts and change every four. fry @ 365'F.

Ami
February 2, 2005 12:23 PM quote 
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I threw SYSCO out of our restaurant (seafood) when I took over and turned it around. SYSCO sucks the lifeblood out of almost every small business and is a very devious company. As I ran three deep fryers, fryer oil was a "hot" topic (no pun intended). FryOn/FryMax and all the supposed long-life products do not resist burning any better than any no-name product - they have a slightly higher smokepoint, but if you do not skim, filter and change (cleaning your fryers well) on a regular basis, it is immaterial whether you use lard or peanut oil or the toughest mix out there - it will all go south anyway. I used to have to fight with my sous to keep the fryers at 365 (less grease penetration in breaded foods), as he was constantly trying to "save" the oil by keeping the thermostats at 350 or less (makes food MUCH greasier and does not save the oil). The nearby Restaurant Depot (which I miss terribly up here in rural New England!) carried a lot of different fryer oils and my rule was "whatever's on sale/cheapest this week" which worked well. Playing with the fry coating compositions can make for the best flavor, although from the view of smokepoint and flavor, peanut oil is absolutely the very best medium.

As far as all these perceived allergies, it is estimated by health officials that less than 1% of the U.S. population actually has a real and genuine food allergy which could cause a reaction or anaphylactic shock; most of those who claim to be allergic to nuts are full of crap and just using that excuse to make themselves feel "special." Whatever happened to this country? So many whiners, babies and "I need attention" victims out there!
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