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May 24, 2010 6:07 PM quote 
Tony Montana is offline Tony Montana
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 No Roll Tenderloin

Theoretical Question.

USDA grading of meat is primarly concerned with marbling.  Since the tenderloin is not a marbled cut does it really matter if it a prime or choice grade?  for that matter what is a no-roll tenderloin like?  I suppose that most of the cattle that are no-roll/not graded are probably old dairy cows but how would that affect the tenderloin.  Has anyone ever used a no-roll tenderloin?

Tony

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May 24, 2010 6:55 PM quote 
kaffeenjunkie is offline kaffeenjunkie
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I would say it depends on your application.

If you are placing a tenderloin front and center grilled R-MR and expect it to stand on its own and you are charging for it, than I would say Prime or Choice.

If you are doing a large party that is price conscious but still wants a little bang and a little sauce you might be able to get away with select.  

If you are going to put it in a chafing dish and smother it in sauce and stuff for a buffet than no roll will work just fine.

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May 24, 2010 7:23 PM quote 
Nutczak is offline Nutczak
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There are several different factors involved when it comes to the USDA grading system, age of the animal, color and texture of the fat, color of the meat, and of course the marbling in the rib roast which is now determined by digital camera and computer system instead of a person.

The quality of beef these days really sucks IMO, the beef that is able to make the Choice grade barely would have made it as select a few decades ago.

As for tenderloins, I agree with junkie. You may be able to get away with a no-roll or utility grade loin in some instances, but forget about trying to use utility grade for a succulent steak cooked to M-R.

I do BBQ, and I will not use a brisket that is not at least choice grade becuase the quality just is not there, and to have a quality finished product, you need to start with quality raw ingredients.

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May 24, 2010 8:56 PM quote 
Brandon94275 is offline Brandon94275
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The biggest difference I recognize in tenderloins through the grading system is shape. A no-roll tenderloin is not firm, not normally as round, and just doesn't make a very attractive steak. There is only a difference in marbling when you get to a prime or authentic kobe tenderloin. In my experience, the rest is comparable on marbling, but the lower the grade, the "looser" the meat and the less attractive the steak. That said, I have used no-roll tenderloin for steaks before, but only because they looked and felt better than normal and we were on a budget.

The best thing to do would be to have your rep break a case and send you one tenderloin, then trim it, cut it and see what the steaks look like. If you can find a use for the rest of the tenderloin without losing money on it, maybe you can get 5 or 6 steaks that still look decent out of one no-roll tender.

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Last edited: May 28, 2010 8:38 PM by Brandon94275
May 24, 2010 10:39 PM quote 
BigTip is offline BigTip
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I've had this discussion with different people before.  If you cut them up to look the same, then cook them the same, I defy anyone to be able to tell the difference between a choice and a no-roll tenderloin steak. ESPECIALLY if are saucing it.


I agree with Brandon that the yield is lower with a no-roll.

May 25, 2010 7:18 AM quote 
chefmel is offline chefmel
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We are a CAB house and we don't serve Tenderloin often (only on our banquet menu), but when we do, we use select.  It's the only piece of beef we use that is select.  I've had nothing but compliments from our guests when we do serve them.  I personally wouldn't go any lower than select if you are cutting them into steaks.  I think you could get away with a no-roll if you were roasting it.  We have some coney islands in my area that buy "Cow" tenders for a very cheap price and then sell them as steaks on their menu, but I would never order one. 

Mark

May 25, 2010 9:46 AM quote 
Nutczak is offline Nutczak
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Quote (original post by: BigTip)

I've had this discussion with different people before.  If you cut them up to look the same, then cook them the same, I defy anyone to be able to tell the difference between a choice and a no-roll tenderloin steak. ESPECIALLY if are saucing it.



I will take that challenge, and I will win.

You sound like my young new Sysco rep who was telling me that I could not tell the difference between Lea & Perrins and Sysco house brand Worcestershire sauce.
He lined up L&P, Heinz, Frenchs, and sysco house brand. And I pointed out the L&P every single time.

A true KOBE tenderloin? I can honestly say I have never even seen one, but I have seen domestic raised WAGYU (Sometimes referred to as American Kobe)

May 25, 2010 5:59 PM quote 
Brandon94275 is offline Brandon94275
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American "kobe" is nothing special in my experience. I haven't seen an American kobe tenderloin, but I would suspect they aren't much different in marbling than a choice tenderloin. A true Kobe tenderoin is very well marbled and a high grade true Japanese Kobe is an incredible site to see. The fat melts at a lower temperature than American beef (77F) and it has a greater amount of healthy fatty acids and less saturated fat.

Here's a good site on Kobe beef.

http://www.wagyukobebeef.com/

Brandon O'Dell
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August 16, 2010 12:26 AM quote 
Terry Price is offline Terry Price
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A term used to describe beef that has not been graded by the USDA. Beef carcasses graded by the USDA have a grading stamp rolled on the exterior fat of the carcass to identify the grade of the meat. Carcasses not graded have no USDA rolling stamp, hence the name “No-Roll”. Unlike the mandatory USDA safety inspection paid for by the government, grading of beef is optional and is paid for by the processor. Since only the best grades of beef (Prime and Choice) justify the expense of optional grading, a large share of the beef sold in the United States is not graded. If it were graded, most of the no-roll beef would be graded “Select”.

Terry Price

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Last edited: August 19, 2010 2:06 PM by Terry Price
August 16, 2010 12:59 AM quote 
Alex_chef2000 is offline Alex_chef2000
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 Beef Tenderloin.

I had used all of the different Beef tenderloin grades: Kobe, Prime, Choice, Select and No-Roll and definitely you can SEE, SMELL and TASTE the difference.

If you are in a budget, you can use a No-Roll using  a marinade and with a strong sauce to cover all the unpleasent flavors and make your customers happy.  

With a Kobe or Prime, you just need Kosher salt and pepper to enjoy a fantastic steak, any sauce can be used to combine with the steak.

Trust me, the grades are there for a reason, you get what you pay for. 

I don't eat much beef because of the prices, but definitely a better grade is a better product.

 


Alex.:

 

 

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