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January 26, 2012 7:53 AM quote 
RangerSchool is offline RangerSchool
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 Liquid Eggs

I have a problem with liquid eggs. I work at a college, and many of the students dislike liquid eggs that we use for scrambled eggs on the steam table. I have a zealous health department that insists we cannot use shell eggs for this purpose. I'm not sure what to do about this. Any ideas?

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January 26, 2012 10:03 AM quote 
michael112931 is offline michael112931
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Ranger....

I guess my biggest question is how do you cook them? If you steam them or bake them in a hotel pan...YUK! If you cook them on a flat top griddle or in a brazier  the texture & flavor profile is not too bad. If the issue is they want farm fresh eggs see below:

You can now buy pastuerized shell eggs through a main purveyor, the manufacturer we use is Davidsons. We pay about $29 for 15 dz it's about $10 more than non pastuerized shell eggs for 15 dz. You can even cook them sunny side up...So tell the students your gonna go to farm fresh eggs (which they are) and charge them .10¢ more. You probably won't get much resistance to the price increase as the product is what they want and it meets DOH specs!

Hope that helped ya!

Chef Mike

Last edited: January 31, 2012 9:52 PM by michael112931
January 26, 2012 11:37 AM quote 
CATERCHEF is offline CATERCHEF
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I have never heard of a health department not permitting the use of USDA Grade A eggs in the shell. I have been using liquid eggs (BIB bag in a box) since they came out and have had no problems except they cost twice as much as whole eggs in the shell. It may be the way you prepare them. I always  add a little cream or half & half and a little salt and white pepper. Before BIB eggs when I cooked eggs for over 1000 for breakfast I would dump flats of shell eggs in a 80qt. mixer and whip them for a couple minutes and strain through a china cap as long as you cooked them to over 160 degrees no problem. (I'm sure some of you perfectionist would not approve of that) But it got the job done and nobody got sick But I wouldn't do it today.

  rolleyes.gif I don't like food that's too carefully arranged; it makes me think that the chef is spending too much time arranging and not enough time cooking.

If I wanted a picture  I'd buy a painting. ............Andy Rooney  thumbup.gif

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January 26, 2012 3:10 PM quote 
CHEF MITCH is offline CHEF MITCH
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I have worked in many facilities that use the 10 and 20 lb bagged liquid eggs. Using shelled eggs is both time consuming and can be dangerous when it comes to storage and foodborne illness. Do you cook the eggs as needed or are they held for long peiods of tme? Try adding some half and half to the eggs before cooking. You might have to experiment with this a couple of times to get the ratio down correctly. Don't know what size bags you are using or what pan sizes. We use strictly 2 inch full sized line pans. Perhaps you need to add a complimentary seasoning to the eggs as well before or halfway into the cooking process. Some people just don't like the taste of liquid eggs because of the pasteurization and citric acid added to them. Doing one or both of these might change their minds. Hope this helps. 

January 26, 2012 5:59 PM quote 
lamael is offline lamael
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I use Papettis liquid eggs, 15 quarts (packed in milk container quart size) liquid eggs and use for all scrambled eggs, I only cook them in a pan ON the stove or on the flat top. It is my understanding in NYS that you are not allowed to crack several shell eggs together and cook them for fear if there is one bad egg that it will spoil the rest of the lot. As far as when we have to make scrambled eggs for buffets we leave them slightly running before putting them on the buffet so that as they are heated on the buffet they will tighten there instead of over tightening.

January 30, 2012 3:16 PM quote 
Steve96164 is offline Steve96164
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It never ceases to amaze me how the human race ever survived before the invention of health departments.

January 30, 2012 8:31 PM quote 
lamael is offline lamael
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Agreed.... its seems as though today we have to spend all of our resources protecting those who are stupid, instead of rewarding those who have common sense.  While I do think it somewhat silly about not being able to "mass crack" eggs, I don't so mind the liquid ones so I don't have to scrambled them....Im not patient enough to whisk them long enough. LOL

January 31, 2012 10:17 AM quote 
chefmel is offline chefmel
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Quote (original post by: lamael)

I use Papettis liquid eggs, 15 quarts (packed in milk container quart size) liquid eggs and use for all scrambled eggs, I only cook them in a pan ON the stove or on the flat top. It is my understanding in NYS that you are not allowed to crack several shell eggs together and cook them for fear if there is one bad egg that it will spoil the rest of the lot. As far as when we have to make scrambled eggs for buffets we leave them slightly running before putting them on the buffet so that as they are heated on the buffet they will tighten there instead of over tightening.

Ranger,

Make sure you are using eggs that only contain eggs and citric acid.  I would stay away from the frozen eggs and any liquid egg product that contains anything other than eggs and citric acid.  I also agree with the comment about leaving them a little "loose" when you put them on the buffet - that's what we do in my operation.

Mark

February 3, 2012 5:59 AM quote 
CATERCHEF is offline CATERCHEF
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I remember once while I was working in a Country Club and a (CIA) Chef ordered  scrambled eggs in a cooking bag that you just put them in a pot of boiling water until they were cooked  "A lot of complaints"( Boy, what a loser) I guess you would call it "Sous Vide" nowadays.

  rolleyes.gif I don't like food that's too carefully arranged; it makes me think that the chef is spending too much time arranging and not enough time cooking.

If I wanted a picture  I'd buy a painting. ............Andy Rooney  thumbup.gif

February 15, 2012 8:57 AM quote 
StoramAbruwin is offline StoramAbruwin
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I do a little 6 hr buffet on sundays to take the pressure off the kitchen,  Ive heard putting a little lemon juice helps preserve them and keeps them from turning green so fast will half and half as I have read above do the same?  Also leaving them a little loose as mentioned above is a good idea too.

Thanks

George

www.thecountrytable.com

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